LNSLNS

We thank Ezziddin and Biersack for their extremely important advice on intracavitary radionuclide therapy with colloidal β-emitters, which has mostly been forgotten. A literature search on PubMed, using the terms “pleural effusion” and “radioisotopes” did not identify any current studies and publications for the past 10 years.

The likely cause is the complex clinical effort involved—the treatment can only be administered on an inpatient basis. The mean survival of patients treated with Y-90 was 288 days (1), which is consistent with the survival prognoses given in our article (2).

The reported remission rate of >80% (1) relates to the malignant pleural effusion, but not the underlying tumor disorder/pleural carcinosis. The success rate with regard to malignant pleural effusion is therefore the same as for talcum

In our opinion, intracavitary radionuclide therapy is also a palliative therapeutic option for patients with a relatively good prognosis, because it means a great logistical effort for the treating physician and inpatient admission for the patient.

DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2013.0612b

On behalf of the authors:

Dr. med. Michael Ried

Abteilung für Thoraxchirurgie

Universitätsklinikum Regensburg

michael.ried@ukr.de

Conflict of interest statement
The authors of all contributions declare that no conflict of interest exists.

1.
Austgen M: Palliative Therapie tumorbedingter Pleuraergüsse mit Radioisotopen. [Palliative therapy oftumor-induced pleural effusions with radioisotopes]. Pneumologie 1989; 43: 88–91 MEDLINE
2.
Ried M, Hofmann HS: The treatment of pleural carcinosis with malignant pleural effusion. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2013; 110(18): 313–8 VOLLTEXT
1.Austgen M: Palliative Therapie tumorbedingter Pleuraergüsse mit Radioisotopen. [Palliative therapy oftumor-induced pleural effusions with radioisotopes]. Pneumologie 1989; 43: 88–91 MEDLINE
2.Ried M, Hofmann HS: The treatment of pleural carcinosis with malignant pleural effusion. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2013; 110(18): 313–8 VOLLTEXT

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