DÄ internationalArchive42/2013Which Side Is Affected?
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It seems to be the received wisdom that in case of a recurrence, patients should again perform their liberatory maneuvers, and the literature is full of instructions on this—but it does not state anywhere how a patient can identify the affected side, so that he or she knows which side to exercise. Here, in the countryside, a specialist in ear, nose, and throat medicine is not always easy to come by. Furthermore, patients are handed instructions (some of which apply to both sides) copied from websites, and one cannot always rely on the patient’s recollection of whether their vertigo is exactly the same as the previous time, i.e. whether the maneuvers should be performed towards the same side as on that occasion.

DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2013.0716a

Dr. med. Heike Osterholz-Middendorf
Alfeld

heike_osterholz@middendorf-alfeld.de

Conflict of interest statement

The author declares that no conflict of interest exists.

1.
Strupp M, Dieterich M, Brandt T: The treatment and natural course of peripheral and central vertigo. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2013; 110(29, 30): 505–16 VOLLTEXT
1.Strupp M, Dieterich M, Brandt T: The treatment and natural course of peripheral and central vertigo. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2013; 110(29–30): 505–16 VOLLTEXT

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