DÄ internationalArchive20/2014Administering Shortages
LNSLNS

Conduct disorders, such as were cited in the article as the reason for prescribing medication, have not actually increased over recent decades. They therefore cannot explain the 2.5–3-fold increase in prescriptions. However, what immediately draws attention is the finding that only about a quarter (27.9%) of antipsychotic prescriptions in children and adolescents were issued by child and adolescent psychiatrists/psychotherapists. Almost three quarters came from pediatricians, general practitioners, and representatives of other specialties, who do not have any special competences in this respect.

These specialists receive their information primarily from pharmaceutical representatives, whose overarching purpose is to increase their companies’ turnover. Another problem that was mentioned is the lack of psychotherapy services for children and adolescents. This is a health political deficit that should not be “covered up” by antipsychotic prescriptions.

Ultimately it is utterly irresponsible that children and adolescents with conduct disorders have no recourse to help in any form other than by having their symptoms sedated and thus being subdued, by taking antipsychotics that massively interfere with the cerebral metabolism. The distress and despair of such children and their families are not taken seriously. The causes of abnormal behavior are not even the subject of any research.

DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2014.0364b

Dr. med. Terje Neraal

Wettenberg

t.neraal@t-online.de

Conflict of interest statement

The author declares that no conflict of interest exists.

1.
Bachmann CJ, Lempp T, Glaeske G, Hoffmann F: Antipsychotic prescriptions in children and adolescents—an analysis of data from a German statutory health insurance company from 2005–2012. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2014; 111: 25–34. VOLLTEXT
1.Bachmann CJ, Lempp T, Glaeske G, Hoffmann F: Antipsychotic prescriptions in children and adolescents—an analysis of data from a German statutory health insurance company from 2005–2012. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2014; 111: 25–34. VOLLTEXT

Info

Specialities