DÄ internationalArchive33-34/2015Lack of Physical Activity
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The article describes extremely interesting prevalence data from one of the most important national studies on cardiovascular risk factors. Most risk factors were defined in a sensible and differentiated manner (for example, diabetes), but questions remain with regard to the topic of physical inactivity.

Participants who exercise less than one hour per week are described as inactive. Persons who exercise for one hour per week therefore do not have this risk factor. This leaves out the remaining 167 hours of the week. More recent data have shown unequivocally that the extent of actual inactivity (time spent sitting down) is a risk factor that is independent of the extent of physical exercise (2). One hour of exercise is in no way sufficient to balance this potential risk and does not conform to international recommendations.

For completeness’s sake we wish to add that, in actual fact, the most important predictor for health risk is physical performance—this includes even subjective fitness, as experienced by individual subjects (less fit/same level of fitness/fitter than people of the same age and sex) and reported in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (3).

The classification relating to the risk factor physical inactivity in the present study is therefore not up to date, in spite of the undisputed merits of the program.

DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2015.0563b

Prof. Dr. med. Burkhard Weisser

Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

Sportmedizin

bweisser@email.uni-kiel.de

1.
Völzke H, Ittermann T, Schmidt CO, et al.: Prevalence trends in lifestyle-related
risk factors—two cross-sectional analyses with a total of 8728 participants from the
Study of Health in Pomerania from 1997 to 2001 and 2008 to 2012. Dtsch
Arztebl Int 2015; 112: 185–92 VOLLTEXT
2.
Biswas A, Oh PI, Faulkner GE, et al.: Sedentary time and its association with risk for disease incidence, mortality, and hospitalization in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med 2015; 162: 123–32 CrossRefMEDLINE
3.
Holtermann A, Marott JL, Gyntelberg F, et al.: Self-reported cardiorespiratory
fitness: prediction and classification of risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and
longevity—a prospective investigation in the Copenhagen City Heart Study.
J Am Heart Assoc 2015; 4: e001495 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central
1.Völzke H, Ittermann T, Schmidt CO, et al.: Prevalence trends in lifestyle-related
risk factors—two cross-sectional analyses with a total of 8728 participants from the
Study of Health in Pomerania from 1997 to 2001 and 2008 to 2012. Dtsch
Arztebl Int 2015; 112: 185–92 VOLLTEXT
2.Biswas A, Oh PI, Faulkner GE, et al.: Sedentary time and its association with risk for disease incidence, mortality, and hospitalization in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med 2015; 162: 123–32 CrossRefMEDLINE
3.Holtermann A, Marott JL, Gyntelberg F, et al.: Self-reported cardiorespiratory
fitness: prediction and classification of risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and
longevity—a prospective investigation in the Copenhagen City Heart Study.
J Am Heart Assoc 2015; 4: e001495 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central

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