LNSLNS

We aimed to study the effect of a module-based intervention on medication and adherence after hospital discharge. The intervention measures were adapted to the requirements of doctors in private practice after optimized communication with the hospitals. We did not aim to study the effect of individual modules or to evaluate the benefit of medication checks; other studies have already done so (1, 2). Studies that were conducted in non-German speaking countries have shown that multifactorial problems at interfaces can be solved quickly by combining several measures in medication management (3).

By pointing out that the information event was not an intervention we intended to clarify that no substantial recommendations were given there—for example, on prescribing after discharge—but only information on the organizational approach to the structure and mailing of the discharge medication plan.

We intentionally selected the categorization in order to classify medication changes that in the assessment of an international expert panel may occur because of communication deficits at discharge between general practitioners, hospitals, and patients We considered medication switches as potentially risky only where it was possible for us to assess these on the basis of the clinical data available to us, as is made clear by the examples listed in eBox 2 in the article (4).

Many medication-related problems are based on medication changes at healthcare interfaces, and an effective focus on this seemingly short time interval in the context of a project seems sensible. Obviously this is not intended to replace general practitioner care—rather, it is meant to provide an adjunct.

DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2017.0223b

Corresponding authors

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Thilo Bertsche

Dr. rer. nat. Claudia Greißing

Zentrum für Arzneimittelsicherheit, Universität und Universitätsklinikum,

Abteilung für Klinische Pharmazie Leipzig

thilo.bertsche@medizin.uni-leipzig.de

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Greißing and Prof. Bertsche declare that they received third-party funding from the Pharmacists’ Association of Baden-Württemberg to support the conduct of this study.

1.
Send AFJ, Schwab M, Gauss A, Rudofsky G, Haefeli WE, Seidling HM: Pilot study to assess the influence of an enhanced medication plan on patient knowledge at hospital discharge. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2014; 70: 1243–50 CrossRef MEDLINE
2.
Wolf C, Pauly A, Mayr A, et al.: Pharmacist-led medication reviews to identify and collaboratively resolve drug-related problems in psychiatry—A controlled, clinical trial. PloS one 2015; 10: e0142011 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central
3.
Farley TM, Shelsky C, Powell S, Farris KB, Carter BL: Effect of clinical pharmacist intervention on medication discrepancies following hospital discharge. Int J Clin Pharm 2014; 36: 430–7 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central
4.
Greißing C, Buchal P, Kabitz HJ, et al.: Medication and treatment adherence following hospital discharge—a study of an intervention aimed at reducing risk associated with medication change. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016; 113: 749–56 VOLLTEXT
1.Send AFJ, Schwab M, Gauss A, Rudofsky G, Haefeli WE, Seidling HM: Pilot study to assess the influence of an enhanced medication plan on patient knowledge at hospital discharge. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2014; 70: 1243–50 CrossRef MEDLINE
2.Wolf C, Pauly A, Mayr A, et al.: Pharmacist-led medication reviews to identify and collaboratively resolve drug-related problems in psychiatry—A controlled, clinical trial. PloS one 2015; 10: e0142011 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central
3.Farley TM, Shelsky C, Powell S, Farris KB, Carter BL: Effect of clinical pharmacist intervention on medication discrepancies following hospital discharge. Int J Clin Pharm 2014; 36: 430–7 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central
4.Greißing C, Buchal P, Kabitz HJ, et al.: Medication and treatment adherence following hospital discharge—a study of an intervention aimed at reducing risk associated with medication change. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016; 113: 749–56 VOLLTEXT

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