DÄ internationalArchive3/2018The Cause is Cesarean Section
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The fact that our children sleep on their backs certainly does not to lead to skull deformities; if it did, all children of my generation (1951) would be walking around with flat heads, as we lay on our backs until we could roll over independently.

Even the youngest healthy children turn their heads in all directions, reducing pressure on specific parts of the skull that might lead to lasting distortion. Distortions of the skull are caused by reduced or disordered function of the cranial sutures, resulting in uneven muscle tension and disruption to the craniosacral system. This can be treated very successfully with manual therapy.

KISS (kinetic imbalances due to suboccipital strain) syndrome is also often present in such cases. This is an abnormal position of the head, sometimes detectable even by laypeople as being “lopsided.” Babies who suffer from this can be recognized by the fact that the neck, in particular, appears twisted and the body is stretched backwards. As a result of reduced mobility and uneven muscle tension on the still malleable bones of the skull, the head is often distorted and the hair rubbed thin. There is frequently an associated neurophysiological disorder, which can lead to sleep disorders, long periods of crying, and digestive problems (known as 3-month colic).

Interestingly, skull deformities are increasing to the same extent that cesarean sections are replacing normal deliveries. Unnatural delivery, including cesarean section, is a leading factor in the development of skull deformities.

However, long-term consequences can usually be prevented by prompt diagnosis and targeted manual therapy, which restores the balance of the cervical vertebrae and the bones of the skull (which always remain mobile until old age) (2).

DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2018.0038b

Dr. med. Gerhard Otto

Physician specializing in general practice, chiropractic, natural remedies, and acupuncture

Germany

info@privatpraxis-essen.com

1.
Linz C, Kunz F, Böhm H, Schweitzer T: Positional skull deformities— etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 535–42 VOLLTEXT
2.
Biedermann H: Das KISS-Syndrom der Neugeborenen und Kleinkinder. Manuelle Medizin 1993; 31: 97–107.
1.Linz C, Kunz F, Böhm H, Schweitzer T: Positional skull deformities— etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 535–42 VOLLTEXT
2.Biedermann H: Das KISS-Syndrom der Neugeborenen und Kleinkinder. Manuelle Medizin 1993; 31: 97–107.

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