On page 745 of the article, the following is stated: “Although a rapidly rising fever triggered the seizure, the administration of antipyretic drugs (ibuprofen, paracetamol) is often forgotten in practice.” A search of the current literature (PubMed: “febrile seizure— prevention/treatment”) shows that it has been known for years that antipyretics are inactive in treatment or prophylaxis of febrile seizures. Nothing has been “forgotten”!

Unfortunately, most current textbooks on pediatrics recommend the administration of paracetamol or ibuprofen – either before, during, or after febrile seizures. Most departments of pediatrics advise the parents of affected children to do the same. If a child has once suffered febrile seizures, the first signs of fever trigger the unreflected and useless administration of antipyretics (which is also stressful to the liver and kidneys). It is therefore quite wrong that a CME article should spread this useless and dangerous “therapeutic option”. Of course, it is still sensible to administer an antipyretic to a child who is under considerable stress due to fever, with impaired general condition, hyperventilation, exsiccosis, etc.
DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2010.0302a

Dr. med. Thomas Lukowski
Zieblandstr. 19
80799 München, Germany
praxis@dr-lukowski.com
1.
Lux A: Treatment of febrile seizures: Historical perspective, current opinions, and potential future directions. Brain Dev 2009; Epub ahead of print [23 Oct]. MEDLINE
2.
Meyburg J, Bernhard M, Hoffmann GF, Motsch J: Principles of Pedi-atric Emergency Care. [Grundlagen für die Behandlung von Notfällen im Kindesalter]. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2009; 106: 739–48. VOLLTEXT
1. Lux A: Treatment of febrile seizures: Historical perspective, current opinions, and potential future directions. Brain Dev 2009; Epub ahead of print [23 Oct]. MEDLINE
2. Meyburg J, Bernhard M, Hoffmann GF, Motsch J: Principles of Pedi-atric Emergency Care. [Grundlagen für die Behandlung von Notfällen im Kindesalter]. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2009; 106: 739–48. VOLLTEXT